Shakespeare In Leadership

Shakespeare In Leadership

Lessons from richard iii & henry v on motivation and inspiration

DESCRIPTION

Motivation and inspiration form central elements of the concept of transformational leadership. Advancing skills and competencies starts from the awareness of our own behaviour and the perception of others in regard to motivation style and preference.

During the workshop, participants will act their way into creating awareness through a dramatic methodology. In various exercises, participants will experiment with role behaviour by taking on the character of leaders and followers. Shakespeare's signature characters of King Henry V and King Richard III will be the stimulus and benchmark against which participants test and assess their personal behaviours.

The stage and Shakespeare's characters provide a unique and safe environment in which managers can test out motivational styles. They open the space for experiments and reflection while providing participants with laughter, intensity, and playfulness of a rehearsal experience.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

You will

  • experience your personal leadeship style
  • experiment with dramatic dimensions
  • receive feedback on the effectiveness of your role performances
  • gain a deeper understanding of your personal style of motivation
  • identify ways to module the dramatic dimensions to yield the most impact on your listeners

Duration

From 3.5 hours to 1 day

motivation; transformational leadership; acting; performing; role; effectiveness; reflection; applied theatre; Shakespeare; Richard III, Henry V

BRIEF CASE EXAMPLES

HENRY V

Henry V was King of England from 1413-1422. After his father's death, Henry ascended the throne and embarked on the Hundred Years; War with France (1337-1453). In this scene, Henry makes a memorable speech - now known as the Saint Crispin's Day Speech - before his English army prior to the Battle of Agincourt, which became his famous military success. Believing in the divine cause, he wants to claim the French throne. He rouses his men to fight with him. 

This is how Sir Laurence Olivier did it.

How would you do it? 

RICHARD III

Richard III was King of England from 1483-1485, when he died in the Battle of Bosworth Field at the age of 32.

He was not the rightful heir to the throne. His brother's son, Edward V, was supposed to be crowned but Richard, who was the Duke of Gloucester and Lord Protector of his nephew, succeeded as Richard III instead. There were accusations that Richard had murdered the young prince.

Nonetheless, on 22 August 1485, Richard led a cavalry deep into the enemy ranks by striking at Henry Tudor. Earlier, there was a conspiracy that Henry Tudor should return from exile and depose Richard III. 

How would you rouse your men to fight and stand behind you?

KEYWORDS

motivation; transformational leadership; acting; performing; role; effectiveness; reflection; applied theatre; Shakespeare; Richard III, Henry V

To experience alternative ways to act